Three Blunders of the Mexican Government’s Propaganda

Eduardo Sanchez Hernandez is the General Coordinator of Social Communication and Spokesman of the Government of the Mexican Republic.

Eduardo Sanchez Hernandez is the General Coordinator of Social Communication and Spokesman of the Government of the Mexican Republic.

There have been more, but three unforgettable moments in the ever more blatant manner in which the Presidency of Mexico promotes actions or want to tackle its setbacks.

One of the most memorable was the famous cover of Time magazine, where the President Enrique Peña Nieto was exalted with the headline: “Saving Mexico”.

Next was an attempt to appease the scandal of the “white house”, through a video message from the First Lady, Angelica Rivera.

The latest is the campaign to defend the energy reform. There, the Mexican Government used a popular expression: “ya chole con tus quejas”. That means “enough of your complaints”.

Eduardo Sanchez Hernandez (@ESanchezHdz) is the responsible for the realization of such brilliant ideas. He is the General Coordinator of Social Communication and Spokesman of the Government of the Mexican Republic.

Some people could say that Mr. Sanchez Hernandez hires consultants, experts in propaganda and campaigns of various types, but is he, as head of the area, who gives approval to the final products, therefore, it is he who must face the costs incurred and messages issued.

The profile of Sanchez Hernandez on the website of the Presidency of the Mexican Republic does not lie (www.presidencia.gob.mx), his responsibilities are: “promote the coordination and cooperation with the media in the country and the foreign media… He coordinates and implements programs or specific campaigns; media interviews, and press conferences of the President “.

The Government is trying to insult
the intelligence of the citizens.

Why are those campaigns or messages shameful? Because the Government is trying to insult the intelligence of the citizens when highlight actions that do not exist for millions of Mexicans, and because the Government tries to justify wrong paths.

The polemic cover of the Time magazine.

The polemic cover of the Time magazine.

Time and “saving Mexico”

With the cover of Time, of 24 February 2014, the Presidency sought to position Enrique Peña Nieto internationally, highlighting the recently approved reforms promoted by the Alliance for Mexico, mainly the energy.

Although the article talks about the “Mexican time”, does not talk about corruption and organized crime in the country, the text written by Michael Crowely extols a President that none of the Mexicans know: a visionary reformer, fresh and young.

The cover was severely criticized in Mexico, because nobody believed that Mr. Peña Nieto was “saving” the country, ravaged by drug cartels and corruption.

The Economist, USA Today, The New York Times and The Washington Post then questioned that Mr. Peña Nieto be really a “savior.”

The clarification of the First Lady

On November 9, 2014, Aristegui Noticias launched on its website a report by Rafael Cabrera, Daniel Lizarraga, Irving Huerta and Sebastian Barragan about the “white house” of the President Enrique Peña Nieto and his wife Angelica Rivera.

The research documented that the mansion was valued in 86 million of pesos, around 7 million dollars in July of that year.

In addition, the reporters revealed that the owner of the residence was Real Estate Engineering Center, a company belonging to Grupo Higa, through its subsidiary Constructora Teya. The last one was part of the consortium that won the tender to build the high-speed train Mexico-Queretaro. Just a few days before publishing the report, the Mexican Government revoked the tender.

Plunged into the maelstrom of criticism for the investigation of the Aristegui Noticias reporters, the Government of the Mexican Republic only managed to respond with a message from the First Lady, which raised the public questions.

In the video, Mrs. Rivera is cornered, dressed in a purple dress and she looks upset when she says that she decided to sell the rights of the house. The principal reason of Mrs. Rivera was because she wanted to stop the “insults and the defamation against her family.”

Mrs. Rivera showed intense stress,
controlled anger…, but above all, with no signs of shame.

Again, far from believing Mrs. Rivera, the informed public opinion questioned her about the origin of the resources that mansion was built. She said that she won the money from her work as an actress in soap operas.

Jesus Franco, Codex Communication, conducted an analysis of the body language of Mrs. Rivera in the video. Mr. Franco concluded that Mrs. Rivera showed intense stress, controlled anger, surprise, fear, voice levels out of range of the message, but above all, with no signs of shame.

#YaCholeConTusQuejas

The latest blunder is a campaign to highlight the benefits of energy reform, but attacking his critics.

Without the slightest qualms, the message of the Mexican Presidency expresses its contempt for those who question its actions, calling them unhappy and ignorant.

In the video spot, two carpenters heard the benefits of structural reforms, but one of the workers expresses his discontent, because he does not believe in those benefits. The other carpenter replies to that, after the reforms, the people received significant benefits, and then he says: “Ya chole con tus quejas” or “enough of your complaints”.

As expected, the critical social networks broke, forcing Sanchez Hernandez’s office to remove the television spot, because the Mexican Government doesn’t consider it “appropriate”, confirmed the Political Animal news portal.

The Mexican Presidency expresses its contempt
for those who question its actions, calling them unhappy and ignorant.

In addition to these three messages, other actions on communication that the Mexican Federal Government has not adequately managed, especially on sensitive issues such as the disappearance of the 43 young people in Ayotzinapa, however that issue needs a separate article.

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